The Ultimate Guide To Choosing Art For Corporate Spaces

Technology, research and insight are drastically changing the idea of what a workplace is and what it should look like. So much so that the draconian idea that offices should be distraction-free zones has been totally flipped on its head. Now there is everything from gyms and nap pods to office dogs and, of course, inspiring art. These corporate culture progressions have been shown to improve productivity, morale and work ethic across the globe… But, before getting too ahead of ourselves with ultra-expensive nap pods and office masseurs, let’s take a look at the easiest tool you can use to drag a corporate space kicking and screaming into 2016.

For the workers

Art can transform a corporate space into an inspiring, productive and creative haven for workers. Impressive paintings or photographs, for example, can motivate employees, which can help them generative innovative ideas. And, by changing the atmosphere of a room using warm colours or comforting landscape or seascape scenes, you can evoke contentment and peace, which can create a general sense of calm in the workplace.

Herding cows  Salthill 004

For the clients

As well as transforming a corporate space for your employees, inspiring art and well-designed interiors create a welcoming environment for visitors and clients. The familiar saying, ‘a picture paints a thousand words’, is extremely relevant here, because artwork can perfectly communicate your business’s core values and services. It can breathe life into a room and connect with clients by presenting something relevant to the types of services people are looking for when they walk through your reception doors.

Across the barley field ..

What is your message?

Let’s look at how art can be used to promote a brand. Take a café that is trying to promote its food as healthy, fresh and in season, for example. Simple, colourful artwork around the walls of fruit or vegetables provides the perfect image of what might take quite a few sentences to describe!

 

Green-Chillis-by-Holly-Somerville
Black-Plums-by-Holly-Somerville

If you own a pub that you want to promote based around traditional live music, then paintings of instruments would be ideal.

Blue Olcan by Ellen Lefrak Learning-The-Violin-by-Conor-Mcguire

Should you have a theme?

Themes can certainly work if there is a particular one you want to stick to. Artwork series work very well in this case. For example, you might choose a series of three canvases to feature on a large wall, and scatter two or three in other areas of the room (depending on how much space there is, of course. You don’t ever want to clutter a room with art!) 

Afternoon Aspen Trio hanging Clonlea Design Elaine Tomlin Heather Mountain Trio in Situ - Clonlea Design - Elaine Tomlin

A series of art could also be used to tell a story or conjure a specific reaction from visitors and clients. For example, you could feature four pieces of artwork depicting each season, or a story of Irish legend and mythology. Both of these themes would be perfect for a tourism-related business.

 

Faoi-Dhraíocht-wm    Naoi-gCeád-Bliain-wm

If you have a particularly colourless, minimalist corporate space, a series of bright, colourful artworks could completely transform the office to make it look more bold, welcoming and fun.

 

Mid-Summers-Dream-20-x-27.5-inch-acrylic-on-canvas Mid-Summers-Dream-20-x-27.5-inch-acrylic-on-canvas

Themes can also come in the form of an actual relevant subject that translates from your industry. An architecture or building firm, for example, could display inspiring construction-related art that reflects their style.

 

the-hotel-by-Vida-Pain Gateway-by-Gary-Kearney

There are endless options for businesses to choose from when designing or updating their interior spaces with art. You just need to ask yourself what your message is, what you want your employees and clients to get out of it, and what would work with the current interior outfit. Browse ArtClick’s catalogue of paintings, drawings and photographs to get inspired!

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